scroll for german version
︎︎︎


ARTISTS    EVENTS    NEWSBLOG    AUDIO/VIDEO    ASSOCIATIONS    CATALOGUE    ABOUT




ZEVS (*1977) is a french artist best known for his ‘liquidation’ technique, where he sabotages the logos of major brands and businesses in an attempt to critique twenty-first century consumer-driven culture. With said interest in mind, Zevs conceived the exhibit Big Oil Splash based on Hockney’s 1967 iconic work A Bigger Splash in 2016.


Hockney Series (2012—2020)

by Ángels Miralda


David Hockney’s A Bigger Splash (1967) is today considered among the iconic paintings of the 20th century. As a quintessential painter, Hockney was drawn to the evasive simulacrum of a constantly shifting surface of water. Set in an idyllic private yard behind a modernist apartment, the painting epitomizes the American Dream lifestyle typical of the 1960s. The suburban calm is interrupted by the static, splashing water. In 2012, Tate Modern arranged the exhibition A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance. The exhibition traced a history of painting from Jackson Pollock to Joan Jonas—establishing a relation between the painted image, the materiality of paint, and its relation to the human body. [1] These are all elements that explain French artist ZEVS dedication to this one painting in particular.
        Aguirre Schwarz aka ZEVS came to prominence in the 1990s for his actions against corporate logos in public space. By borrowing the term “liquidation” from corporate lingo and lending it physical shape by dousing company logos in paint, ZEVS points to the inherent violence in desiring the liquidity of assets. Poignantly, to “liquidate” also means to kill by violent means: In the hands of ZEVS paint becomes weaponized as the material of both image-making and of image-destruction. Hockney’s A Bigger Splash became the setting for a series of paintings in which ZEVS studio practice and street practice intermix.
        ZEVS’ street practice infiltrates art history through a recreation of Hockney’s painting—today, the recognisable villa might belong to a manager, a CEO or an executive. The once idyllic space becomes a lost paradise with petrol logos from around the world alternately adorning its facade—liquidated by their own product, oil drips and gathers into toxic puddles. Its thick sanguine tracks invade the groomed waters of what we imagine to be the executive’s private pool. The water, once calm, becomes a toxic substance saturated by flammable concentrations of marbling crude oil gathering on the surface.

Aguirre Schwarz / ZEVS, The Big Oil Splash (Exxon Blue / Blue) detail, 2016, 150 × 150 cm, mixed media on canvas. Courtesy: Aguirre Schwarz (aka ZEVS)
       
Oil moguls prospect oil reserves in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and in the underwater lagoons of the Persian Gulf—but they themselves never reside in the environments that suffer from the toxic consequences associated with the extractive process. In this context, “liquidation” means transporting the natural disasters which these companies are responsible for into the private sphere. Similar to radical actions of eco-activism that cite the widespread phrase “NIMBY” (Not in my Backyard), the action repositions territorial associations in a system which only guarantees non-toxic living to wealthy or geographic elites.
        As a nod to Hergé’s Tintin, ZEVS titled the catalogue documenting the series Aguirre Schwarz au Pays de L’Or Noir. In the guise of the unlikely hero who travels across continents to unmask villains, ZEVS exposes interconnected networks of shape-shifting corporations that operate in a de-territorialised world of capital. Singular events seemingly disappear into a vortex of data where news events coalesce into one large global catastrophe. Only this year, the MK Wakashio oil spill off the coast of Mauritius spewed 1,000 tonnes of oil near Pointe d’Esny after colliding into a coral reef. Yet little has been published in the midst of a year where an abundance of catastrophes has laid bare glaringly dysfunctional social and political systems. ZEVS illustrates how executives will only act once the oil is in their own pools—a way of bringing the world home. Ecological disasters of huge proportions are displaced into the insignificant volume of a private pool that belongs to a home paid for in Middle Eastern oil and decorated with palms native to Venezuela.
        Although the oil is brought into the frame of the Hockney Paintings through a rogue maneuver, it unveils the relation between the setting to the material that paid for it. This lifestyle is only made possible through extractive regimes that often impede on neo-colonial territories rife with social tension and overburdened by resource curse. For populations who have suffered at the expense of global demand for extraction and the lack of effective carbon curbing measures off the shores of Mauritius, this idea of a lost paradise is very real. In Reza Negarestani’s novel Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials (2008), [2] oil is a creature awakened from the core of the earth. Its complex consciousness cannot be compared to that of a human spirit, but something much darker and tellurian in scale. Through the partially real, partially fictional sciences and philosophies of paleopetrology and pyrodemonism, teratology to the solar rattle, Negarestani’s oil descends through a post-Deleuzian nonlinear reality to form a logic of its own. The sentient Oil comprises the body and mind of an imagined Middle East, whose deserts and open pits of fire possess human minds in order to free its atomic poltergeists into the atmosphere of the living. Oil executives may believe that they are working to enrich themselves, but in Negarestani’s work of theory-fiction, they are simple pawns under the auspice of demonic and radioactive forces deep beneath and above the Earth.
        In a similar neo-materialist vein, ZEVS operates with paint as a live agent. Its properties are weaponised, and image-making becomes an act of sabotage. Paint is trained on specific opponents that seem large and de-territorialised— the corporate-behemoth as demon and god. In conversation, ZEVS points out the relationship modern corporations have to Hellenistic hierarchy: “We know who buys the oil, we know who is responsible when it spills, and yet they are untouchable.” [3] Aguirre Schwarz borrows his pseudonym from a regional train that operates in Paris: “Zeus”, homonymous with the Greek god, sluices through the urban underground like the Titans condemned to the underworld—a petro-demonic tsunami that may one day turn the tide of fate.
        ZEVS’ connection to Hockney and the swirling iridescent oil-films of the Californian dream villas point out the art world’s own reciprocal relationship with the fossil fuel industry. His appropriation of this particular painting is not as much a criticism of Hockney, as an uncovering of the necessary relationships that artists foster in order to keep their studio practice profitable. In that sense, ZEVS’ mixture of studio and street practice evokes large-scale actions and performances that have successfully won out over firms in the past. This series epitomizes hope, and an affirming conviction that such actions do succeed. Shortly after Tate staged the exhibition A Bigger Splash, the museum gained notoriety for its continued sponsorship by British oil magnate BP, one of the logos featured in ZEVS’ series. In 2015, climate activists occupied the museum, performing a live drawing session in which they covered the Turbine Hall in graffiti that warned of the effects of climate change.The following year it was announced that the BP funding to Tate was to be “liquidated”. While the institution might not consider these unauthorised performances to be part of its programme, they did ultimately change the institution and the history of art.


[1] A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance, Tate Modern, 14 November 2012–1 April 2013.

[2] Reza Negarestani, Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials, Re.Press, 2008.

[3] Conversation with Aguirre Schwarz (aka ZEVS) 4 September 2020.



Aguirre Schwarz / ZEVS, The Big Oil Splash (Exxon Blue / Blue) detail, 2016, 150 × 150 cm, mixed media on canvas. Courtesy: Aguirre Schwarz (aka ZEVS)
Aguirre Schwarz / ZEVS, The Big Oil Splash (BP Blue / Blue), 2016, 150 × 150 cm, mixed media on canvas. Courtesy: Aguirre Schwarz (aka ZEVS)

ZEVS (*1977) ist ein französischer Künstler, der vor allem für seine ‘Liquidierungs’-Technik bekannt ist, bei der er Logos großer Marken und Unternehmen sabotiert, um die konsumorientierte Kultur des einundzwanzigsten Jahrhunderts zu kritisieren. Diesem Interesse folgend, konzipierte Zevs 2016 in der Lazarides Gallery die Ausstellung Big Oil Splash, die sich auf Hockneys ikonenhafte Arbeit A Bigger Splash von 1967 bezog.



Hockney Series (2012—2020)

von Ángels Miralda


David Hockneys A Bigger Splash (1967) gehört zu den Ikonen der Kunst des 20. Jahrhunderts. Hockney, ein Maler durch und durch, faszinierte hierbei das trügerische Scheinbild einer sich ständig verändernden Wasseroberfläche. Sein Bild zeigt einen gepflegten Garten hinter einem modernistischen Bungalow, der den amerikanischen Lebensstil der 1960er-Jahre verkörpert. Die Vorstadtidylle wird durch das hochspritzende Wasser gebrochen. Im Jahr 2012 zeigte Tate Modern die Ausstellung A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance, in der die Geschichte der Malerei von Jackson Pollock bis Joan Jonas nachgezeichnet und die Beziehungen zwischen dem gemalten Bild, der Materialität der Farbe und dem menschlichen Körper untersucht wurde. [1] Dies sind auch die Elemente, die den französischen Künstler ZEVS zu seinen Variationen auf Hockneys Gemälde inspirierten.
        Aguirre Schwarz aka ZEVS wurde in den 1990er-Jahren für seine Aktionen gegen Firmenlogos im öffentlichen Raum bekannt. Seine Liquidated Logos, bei denen er Firmenzeichen mittels Farbschlieren „verflüssigt“, wurden zum Inbegriff seiner Guerilla-Street-Art. Indem er den aus der Finanzwelt entliehenen Begriff „Liquidation“ materialisiert, verweist er auf die inhärente Gewalt von „liquiden“ – sprich frei zirkulierenden – Vermögenswerten. Jemanden zu „liquidieren“ bedeutet aber auch, ihn mit Gewalt zu töten. In den Händen von ZEVS wird Farbe zu einer Waffe, die der Bilderzeugung und der Bildzerstörung gleichermaßen dient. A Bigger Splash ist der Schauplatz einer Bilderserie, in der ZEVS Atelierpraxis und Street Art miteinander kombiniert: Mit Street Art infiltriert er die Kunstgeschichte, in Hockneys Gemälde dargestellt durch die emblematische Villa, die heute wahrscheinlich einem hochrangigen Manager oder CEO gehören würde. Der idyllische Raum wird zum verlorenen Paradies: Auf der Fassade der Villa prangern Logos von Ölkonzernen, übergossen mit eben jenem giftigen Produkt, mit dem diese ihre Profite erwirtschaften. Die petrokapitalistischen Logos – BP, Shell, Total etc. – bluten buchstäblich Rohöl. Dickflüssige Blutgerinnsel bilden eine Lache auf dem Boden und fließen in das makellose Wasser des Pools. Das Wasser wird zu einer giftigen Substanz, die nun durch leicht entflammbare Konzentrationen von Rohöl auf der Oberfläche gesättigt wird.
        Ölmogule lassen nach Ölreserven in den Wüsten Saudi-Arabiens und in den Unterwasserlagunen des Persischen Golfs bohren, leben jedoch selbst nie an Orten, die unter den toxischen Folgen des Förderprozesses leiden. In diesem Zusammenhang verweist der Begriff „Liquidation“ auf die Transposition der von ihren Unternehmen verursachten Naturkatastrophen in die Privatsphäre. Im Sinne einer radikalen öko-aktivistischen Aktion zur Anprangerung des oft zitierten NIMBY-Phänomens (Not In My Backyard), werden in ZEVS Serie geografische Assoziationen innerhalb eines Systems neu verortet, das nur wohlhabenden oder geografischen Eliten ein gesundes Leben ermöglicht.
        In Anspielung auf Hergés Tim und Struppi trägt der Katalog, der die Serie dokumentiert, den Titel Aguirre Schwarz au Pays de L’Or Noir [dt.: „Aguirre Schwarz im Reich des Schwarzen Goldes“]. Im Gewand des atypischen Helden, der um die Welt reist, um Bösewichte zu entlarven, enthüllt ZEVS das globale Netzwerk, das es großen Unternehmen, die in der entgrenzten Welt des Kapitals agieren, ermöglicht, Steuern zu umgehen.
        Einzelne maßgebliche Ereignisse in diesem Zusammenhang scheinen heute in einer Flut von Daten und Nachrichten unterzugehen, die von einer gemeinsamen globalen Katastrophe berichten. Erst in diesem Jahr flossen vor der Küste von Mauritius 1000 Tonnen Öl ins Meer, nachdem der Frachter Wakashio auf ein Korallenriff aufgelaufen war. Über das Desaster wurde jedoch wenig berichtet, da es sich inmitten eines Jahres ereignete, in dem die schiere Anzahl katastrophaler Ereignisse die grundlegende Dysfunktionalität der gegenwärtigen sozialen und politischen Systeme offenbarte. ZEVS bekräftigt, dass die Führungseliten erst dann handeln werden, wenn das Öl in ihren eigenen Pools landet – er bringt sozusagen die Welt nach Hause.
        Obwohl das Öl erst durch einen Kunstgriff in den Fokus der Hockney Paintings rückt, verbildlicht es die Beziehung zwischen dem Ort und der Materie, dank derer er erkauft wurde. Der dazugehörige Lebensstil wird durch Ölfelder in ehemaligen kolonialen oder neokolonialen Gebieten ermöglicht, die unter sozialen Spannungen und Ressourcenmangel leiden. Die Vorstellung eines verlorenen Paradieses wird an den Ufern von Mauritius geradezu greifbar, wie auch in zahlreichen anderen Ländern, die von Korruption und sozialen Unruhen infolge der weltweiten Nachfrage nach Öl und in Ermangelung wirksamer Maßnahmen zur Eindämmung des CO2-Ausstoßes geprägt sind. In Reza Negarestanis Roman Cyclonopedia. Komplizenschaft mit anonymen Materialien (2008) [2] ist Öl eine Kreatur, die aus dem Erdkern emporsteigt. Ihr komplexes Bewusstsein kann nicht mit dem menschlichen Geist verglichen werden, ist es doch etwas viel Dunkleres, Tellurisches. Von Paläopetrologie und Pyrodemonismus über Teratologie bis hin zu Solarklappern (Solar rattle) durchläuft das Öl, die Hauptfigur in Negarestanis theoretisch-fiktiver Geschichte, eine post-deleuzianische, und damit nicht nichtlineare Realität, einer eigenen Logik folgend. Öl als empfindungsfähiges Material umfasst Körper und Geist eines imaginären Nahen Ostens, dessen Wüsten und brennende Ölquellen die Gehirne der Menschen kontrollieren, um seine atomaren Poltergeister in die Atmosphäre zu entlassen. Die Ölmanager glauben vermutlich, dass sie arbeiten, um sich selbst zu bereichern, doch in Negarestanis Vision sind sie nur Schachfiguren in einer Welt, die von dämonischer Besessenheit und radioaktiven viralen Kräften tief unter und über der Erde kontrolliert wird.
        Im gleichen neomaterialistischen Geist arbeitet ZEVS mit Farbe als lebendigem Material. Ihre Eigenschaften werden als Kampfmittel eingesetzt, die Bilderzeugung wird zum Sabotageakt. Mit Farbe werden Gegner anvisiert, die übermächtig und entgrenzt scheinen – das Großunternehmen als Dämon und Gott. Im Gespräch weist der Künstler auf die Beziehung heutiger Unternehmen zur hellenistischen Hierarchie hin: „Wir wissen, wer das Öl kauft, wir wissen, wer verantwortlich ist, wenn es ausläuft, und doch sind sie unantastbar.“ [3] Schwarzers Pseudonym ist einem Regionalzug in Paris entliehen: „ZEUS“ schlängelt sich durch den städtischen Untergrund wie die zur Unterwelt verurteilten Titanen – ein potenzieller petro-dämonischer Tsunami, der eines Tages das Schicksal wenden könnte.
        ZEVS Verbindung zu Hockney und die schillernden Ölschlieren der kalifornischen Traumvillen verweisen auf die Beziehungen der Kunstwelt zur fossilen Brennstoffindustrie. Seine Appropriation dieses spezifischen Gemäldes ist weniger eine Kritik an Hockney als vielmehr ein klärender Hinweis auf die Beziehungen, die Künstler zu Gönnern unterhalten, um ihre profitable Atelierpraxis aufrecht zu erhalten. In diesem Sinne erinnert ZEVS Mischung aus Atelierpraxis und Street Art an groß angelegte öffentliche Aktionen und Performances, die in der Vergangenheit erfolgreich gegen große Unternehmen ins Feld gezogen sind. Seiner Serie wohnt Hoffnung inne sowie die affirmative Überzeugung, dass Handeln Erfolge erzielt. Kurz nach der Ausstellung A Bigger Splash schrieb die Tate Schlagzeilen wegen ihres langfristigen Sponsoring-Vertrags mit dem britischen Ölkonzern BP (dessen Logo auch Teil der Serie von ZEVS ist). Im Jahr 2015 besetzten Klimaaktivisten das Museum und führten eine Live-Zeichenperformance durch, bei der sie die Turbinenhalle mit Graffiti bemalten, die vor den Auswirkungen des Klimawandels warnten. Im darauffolgenden Jahr wurde das BP-Sponsoring für die Tate „liquidiert“. Obwohl das Museum die nicht autorisierte Performance wohl kaum als Teil seines Programms verstand, hat sie doch die Institution und die Kunstgeschichte verändert.


[1] A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance, Tate Modern, 14. November 2012 – 1. April 2013.

[2] Reza Negarestani, Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials, Re.Press 2008.

[3] Der Künstler im Gespräch mit der Autorin, 4. September 2020.


CURATOR
Valeria Schulte-Fischedick
ASSISTANCE
Gustav Elgin / Carola Uehlken
OPENING HOURS
6th of August – 15th of September
Tue—Sunday 
2—7 pm
Kottbusser Str. 10, 10999 Berlin

OPENING HOURS
Tue—Sunday
2—7 pm
Kottbusser Str. 10,  10999 Berlin

CURATOR
Valeria Schulte-Fischedick

ASSISTANCE
Gustav Elgin / Carola Uehlken

Impressum
Kontakt
︎︎︎︎