scroll for german version
︎︎︎


ARTISTS    EVENTS    NEWSBLOG    AUDIO/VIDEO    ASSOCIATIONS    CATALOGUE    ABOUT





Santiago Mostyn, Citizen, 2015 - 2017, two channel HD video installation, 4:12:00 min, film stills. Courtesy: Santiago Mostyn

SANTIAGO MOSTYN
(b. 1981) makes films, installations and performances that test and show the divide between disparate cultural spheres, employing an intuitive process to engage with a knowledge and history grounded equally in the body and the rational mind. He is based in Sweden but maintains strong ties to Zimbabwe, Trinidad & Tobago, the countries of his upbringing.


Don’t Look Back or the Horizon is an Imagined Country

by Övül Ö. Durmusoglu



When is it time to dream of another country or to embrace other strangers as allies or to make an opening, an overture, where there is none? When is it clear that the old life is over, a new one has begun and there is no looking back?” [1]

— Saidiya Hartman

It is the crossing that forces history to change throughout time; the old that is left behind would never be the same place, the one who leaves would never be the same person. The horizon is an imagined country. So potent with dreams, traumas, conflicts and small or big victories. The sea embodies them all while creating miracles of passage or burying bodies over invisible borders. Stories of crossing—despite being idiosyncratic— resonate with each other over imperialist and colonialist regimes of violence in order to build “the new”.
        Santiago Mostyn’s multidisciplinary practice is infatuated with the road itself and the temporalities of crossing. He builds constellations around bodies and subjectivities that come together, transform or break apart at the intersections of crossing. His installations desire to record those illegible moments and instances at stake of being erased by stereotypical history writing. Mostyn often creates situations where certain public contracts are negotiated through and around his body, in which crossing as a method takes place over fragile social spaces. Speaking of his methodological inspirations in a studio visit interview with Studio Museum Harlem, the artist points out Italo Calvino’s book Six Memos for the Next Millennium [2], for shaping a delicate touch as the most productive way of facing severe, heavy questions of race, belonging, sexuality.
        Citizen (2015–2017)—which echoes Claudia Rankine’s powerful book of poetry Citizen: An American Lyric [3] – is the outcome of his solitary crossing action in the Aegean Sea with a simple boat between Dilek Peninsula of the Turkish side towards Samos of the Greek side, in a wide arc of 13 kilometres.
        The shortest distance between these two points is the closest meeting point for Turkish and Greek coastlines, and are under constant watch by military bases on both sides. The Aegean Sea Mostyn empowers as a protagonist in his over five hours long, real time visual tale of crossing, is factually described as an elongated embayment of the Mediterrannean Sea located between the Greek and Anatolian peninsulas, between the mainlands of Greece and Turkey from the early twentieth century, and between the European Union and what lies outside of it from the twenty first-century. Formed over the course of more than 20 million years, its distinctive archipelago includes more than 6000 islands and islets, which embroider a space spanning dreams and traumas, life and death. A sea that is the carrier of mythological journeys. A liminal zone of power, authority and governance. An ambivalent border projecting memories of loss, longing and pain for both sides. The short distances in between—such as Dilek Peninsula and Samos, Çeşme and Chios, Assos and Lesvos, Bodrum and Kos—and grey areas around some islets are often instrumentalised as part of the political chessboard between Turkish and Greek governments. Transferred from generation to generation is the trauma of the early 1920s, in which Greeks and Turks found themselves in a bloody confrontation with each other after centuries of living together, and the trauma of forced migration or the so-called “population exchange” from Turkey to Greece and vice versa, in the process of nation state building and defining borders. The physically defined yet psychologically ambivalent borders introduced two different citizenships into the same sea with edges sharpened by the European fortress policies. While daily ferries recently started to take Turkish passengers to the islands with temporary permits, crossing took on a different meaning in 2015 during that long summer of migration, when Mostyn started to work on Citizen, risking his passage from a heavily controlled zone without any legal permit. As the number of the refugees hoping to cross over to Europe using the islands’ closeness to the Turkish coast increased drastically, children watched the departure of migrants in rubber boats chased across the sea by Greek Border Security with binoculars, as if following a computer game.
        The metaphorical reconstruction of that gazing distance of life and death in Citizen’s installation takes place through two back-to-back screens respectively showing Mostyn’s departure from Dilek Peninsula and arrival to Samos, evoking many artistic and cinematic instances of departure and arrival. Through back-toback screens, Mostyn empathises with the crossing body trapped in the tense power play between two states. While the departure is framed around close ups from body perspective, the arrival is starker and more imposing with its continuous recording of the crossing from a higher angle on the coast. The timeless space in between, immeasurable by any scientific means, is marked by the two oars the artist used in his crossing. In its subtlety and playfulness, Citizenposes the burning question of power and sovereignty exercised on human life in the loaded histories of discovery, colonisation, slave trade, forced migration, genocide and war.
        Unlike Mostyn’s designated place of arrival, in 2020 we are headed towards an uncertain future loaded with a number of forthcoming changes, that foresee a gradual collapse of centuries old dysfunctional thought, behaviour and action models. On the edges of state sovereignty, this crossing looks to be another historical one. This time hopefully to take us towards a prospect Ariella Aisha Azoulay calls “cocitizenship”: “Cocitizenship is not a goal for the future to come but as a set of assumptions and practices shared by different people—including scholars— who oppose imperialism, colonialism, racial capitalism and its institution of citizenship as a set of rights against and at the expense of others.” [4]


[1] Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Trade, New York, Farrar Straus Giroux, 2007.

[2] Italo Calvino, Sechs Vorschläge für das nächste Jahrtausend, Hanser [dt. 1991]; orig.: Lezioni americane. Sei proposte per il prossimo millennio, Vorlesungen von 1985, erstmals auf Englisch publiziert 1988.

[3] Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric, Minneapolis, Graywolf Press, 2014.

[4] Ariella Aisha Azoulay, Potential History: Unlearning Imperialism, London, Verso Books, 2019.

SANTIAGO MOSTYN (*1981) macht Filme, Installationen und Performances, die die Kluft zwischen verschiedenen kulturellen Sphären erproben und aufzeigen. Er setzt Intuition ein, um mit einem Wissen und einer Geschichte in Berührung zu kommen, die gleichermaßen im Körper und im rationalen Verstand gründen. Er lebt in Schweden, unterhält aber enge Beziehungen zu Simbabwe, Trinidad und Tobago, den Ländern, in denen er aufgewachsen ist.




Sieh nicht zurück oder der Horizont ist ein imaginiertes Land

von  Övül Ö. Durmusoglu



„Wann ist es Zeit, von einem anderen Land zu träumen oder Fremde als Verbündete zu umarmen oder etwas zu öffnen, eine Annäherung zu wagen, wo sie noch nicht besteht? Wann ist klar, das alte Leben ist vorbei, ein neues hat begonnen, und es gibt keinen Blick zurück?“  [1]

— Saidiya Hartman




Es sind Überquerungen, die die Geschichte zwingen, sich mit der Zeit zu verändern; Vergangenes, das zurückbleibt, wird nie mehr der gleiche Ort sein, derjenige, der geht, bleibt niemals derselbe Mensch. Der Ausblick richtet sich auf ein imaginäres Land; so reich an Träumen, an Traumata, Konflikten, an kleinen oder großen Triumphen. Das Meer verbindet sie alle, über unsichtbare Grenzen hinweg ermöglicht es das Wunder des Durchkommens oder wird zum Grab für die Toten. Die Geschichten von Grenzüberschreitungen, obwohl ganz individuell, sind in einer Art Resonanz miteinander verbunden, die von imperialistischen und kolonialistischen Gewaltregimes kündet, die dabei sind, „das Neue“ zu errichten.
        In seiner interdisziplinären Praxis ist Santiago Mostyn fasziniert vom Unterwegssein an sich und von den zeitlichen Dimensionen der Grenzüberschreitungen; er kreiert Konstellationen, die um Körper und Subjektivitäten kreisen und die an Kreuzungspunkten des Übergangs zueinanderfinden, sich verwandeln oder zerbrechen. In seinen Installationen möchte er solche unmerklichen Momente des Übergangs einfangen, Augenblicke, die eine stereotype Geschichtsschreibung auszulöschen drohen. Oft stellt er dafür Situationen her, in denen bestimmte gesellschaftliche Übereinkünfte über seinen oder anhand seines Körpers zur Disposition gestellt sind; Grenzüberschreitung als Methode, sie entfaltet sich über fragile gesellschaftliche Räume. In einem Ateliergespräch mit dem Studio Museum Harlem über methodische Inspirationen kommt der Künstler auf Italo Calvinos Buch Sechs Vorschläge für das nächste Jahrtausend [2] zu sprechen, dass eine Geste der Zartheit die vielleicht produktivste Art sei, um sich großen und schwerwiegenden Themen zu stellen wie den so schwierigen Fragen von Rasse, Zugehörigkeit und Sexualität.
        Die Arbeit Citizen (2015–2017) – eine Anspielung auf Claudia Rankines eindrucksvollen Gedichtband Citizen: An American Lyric [3] – ist das Ergebnis seiner Aktion der einsamen Durchquerung der Ägäis mit einem einfachen Boot, ausgehend von der türkischen Halbinsel Dilek nach Samos auf griechischer Seite in einem weiten 13 Kilometer langen Bogen. Die kürzeste Distanz zwischen den beiden Punkten entspricht der engsten Verbindung zwischen der türkischen und der griechischen Küste, Militärstützpunkte auf beiden Seiten sorgen hier für permanente Überwachung. Die Ägäis, die Mostyn zur Protagonistin seiner mehr als fünfstündigen visuellen Echtzeit-Erzählung der Überquerung erhebt, wird de facto als langgestreckte Einbuchtung des Mittelmeers beschrieben, verortet zwischen den griechischen und anatolischen Halbinseln, zwischen dem griechischen und dem türkischen Festland des frühen zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts und zwischen der Europäischen Union und sie umgebenden Staaten im einundzwanzigsten Jahrhundert. Der im Laufe von über 20 Millionen Jahren entstandene, unverwechselbare Archipel umfasst mehr als 6000 größere bis winzige Inseln, die sich über einen Raum verteilen, der Träume und Traumata, Leben und Tod in sich birgt. Ein Meer, verwoben mit mythologischen Reisen. Ein Grenzgebiet von Macht, Autorität und Regierungsgewalt. Eine ambivalente Grenze, die auf beiden Seiten Erinnerungen an Verlust, Sehnsucht und Schmerz hervorruft.
        Diese kurzen Distanzen – etwa zwischen der Halbinsel Dilek und Samos, Çeşme und Chios, Assos und Lesbos, Bodrum und Kos – sowie einige Inseln in staatlichen Grauzonen werden von der türkischen und der griechischen Regierung häufig für politisches Schachspiel instrumentalisiert. Das Trauma der frühen 1920er-Jahre, bei dem Griechen und Türken nach jahrhundertelanger guter Nachbarschaft in eine blutige Konfrontation versanken, wird von Generation zu Generation weitergegeben, auch das Trauma von erzwungener Migration im Prozess von Nationalstaatsbildung und Grenzziehung, eines sogenannten „Bevölkerungsaustauschs“ von der Türkei nach Griechenland und umgekehrt. Diese klar definierten, psychologisch aber ambivalenten Grenzen brachten in ein und demselben Meer zwei unterschiedliche Staatsbürgerschaften hervor, eine Grenzziehung, die durch die europäische Festungspolitik noch weiter verschärft wurde. Während heute tägliche Fährverbindungen türkische Passagiere mit befristeter Aufenthaltsgenehmigung auf die Inseln bringen, hatte eine Überfahrt im langen Flüchtlingssommer von 2015 eine völlig andere Bedeutung, denn als Mostyn anfing, an Citizen zu arbeiten, riskierte er die Überfahrt aus einer extrem stark kontrollierten Zone ohne jede legale Genehmigung. Als die Zahl der Flüchtlinge, die hofften, durch die Nähe der Inseln zur türkischen Küste nach Europa zu gelangen, drastisch anstieg, haben Kinder die Ausreise der Migranten in Gummibooten beobachtet, wie sie vom griechischen Grenzschutz wie bei einem Computerspiel mit einem Fernglas übers Meer gejagt wurden.


Santiago Mostyn, Citizen, 2015 - 2017, two channel HD video installation, 4:12:00 min, film stills. Courtesy: Santiago Mostyn

        Die metaphorische Rekonstruktion dieser Sichtweite von Leben und Tod geschieht in der Installation Citizen über zwei hintereinander geschaltete Bildschirme, die jeweils Mostyns Abfahrt von der Halbinsel Dilek und seine Ankunft auf Samos zeigen und sie führen künstlerisch und filmisch viele Momente von Abreise und Ankunft vor Augen. Durch die gestaffelten Screens fühlt sich Mostyn in den Reisenden ein, der gefangen ist im spannungsgeladenen Kräftespiel zwischen zwei Zuständen; während die Abreise mit Nahaufnahmen aus Körperperspektive operiert, ist die Ankunft mittels kontinuierlicher Aufnahme der Überfahrt, gefilmt von einer höhergelegenen Kamera an der Küste, imposanter und eindringlicher gehalten. Dieser zeitlose Raum dazwischen, der wissenschaftlich nur schwer zu ermessen ist, wird charakterisiert durch die zwei Ruder, die der Künstler bei seiner Überquerung verwendete. In all seiner Zartheit und Spielfreude stellt Citizen die drängende Frage nach Macht und Souveränität, die in der belasteten Geschichte von Entdeckung, Kolonialisierung, Sklavenhandel, Zwangsmigration, Völkermord und Krieg dem menschlichen Dasein aufgenötigt wird.
        Anders als bei Mostyns geplantem Ankunftsort steuern wir im Jahr 2020 in eine ungewisse Zukunft, belastet durch viele bevorstehende Veränderungen, die den allmählichen Zusammenbruch jahrhundertealter dysfunktionaler Denk-, Verhaltensund Handlungsmodelle erahnen lassen. Am Rande der Staatssouveränität scheint dieser Übergang ein weiterer historischer zu sein, der uns diesmal hoffentlich in eine Offenheit führt, die Ariella Aisha Azoulay als „Mitbürgerschaft“ bezeichnet, „nicht als Ziel in vager Zukunft, sondern als Reihe von Praktiken, geteilt von Menschen, die sich gegen Imperialismus, Kolonialismus und einen rassistischen Kapitalismus wenden sowie gegen dessen Idee einer Staatsbürgerschaft als Rechtesystem, das sich gegen andere richtet und auf Kosten anderer gilt.” [4]


[1] Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Trade, New York, Farrar Straus Giroux, 2007.

[2] Italo Calvino, Sechs Vorschläge für das nächste Jahrtausend, Hanser [dt. 1991]; orig.: Lezioni americane. Sei proposte per il prossimo millennio, Vorlesungen von 1985, erstmals auf Englisch publiziert 1988.

[3] Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric, Minneapolis, Graywolf Press, 2014.

[4] Ariella Aisha Azoulay, Potential History: Unlearning Imperialism, London, Verso Books, 2019.


CURATOR
Valeria Schulte-Fischedick
ASSISTANCE
Gustav Elgin / Carola Uehlken
OPENING HOURS
6th of August – 15th of September
Tue—Sunday 
2—7 pm
Kottbusser Str. 10, 10999 Berlin

OPENING HOURS
Tue—Sunday
2—7 pm
Kottbusser Str. 10,  10999 Berlin

CURATOR
Valeria Schulte-Fischedick

ASSISTANCE
Gustav Elgin / Carola Uehlken

Impressum
Kontakt
︎︎︎︎