scroll for german version
︎︎︎


ARTISTS    EVENTS    NEWSBLOG    AUDIO/VIDEO    ASSOCIATIONS    CATALOGUE    ABOUT





Fermín Jiménez Landa, The Swimmer, 2013, video, 8:54 min, film still. Courtesy: Fermín Jiménez Landa



FERMÍN JIMENÉZ LANDA
(*1979 in Pamplona, Spain) lives and works in Valencia. In his performances, public interventions or installations, he works with processes of equivalence, inversion and interchangeability that make us see reality from a point equidistant from the absurd and prudent, the moving and iconoclastic, the empirical and unverifiable. Inspired by the everyday and the familiar, he distorts the usual rigidity of public spaces through subtle actions. His work has been shown at multiple festivals and exhibitions, recently at Das Weiße Haus (Vienna) in the progamme Screening Apparatus in 2020, Manifesta 11 (Zurich), TIER (Berlin), Künstlerhaus Bethanien, La Casa Encendida (Madrid), MUSAC (León, Spain) among others.


Pool by Pool They Form a River

by Vanino Saracino


In his performance El Nadador [eng.: “The Swimmer”] Fermín Jiménez Landa swims back home following a straight line made out of swimming pools spotted using GPS and Google Earth. By crossing Spain from Tarifa to his parent’s pool in Pamplona, the artist explores the value of uncertainty against that of predictability, confronting the outcomes of “wasting time” against those of planned productivity. This seemingly surreal journey traces a personal map of a territory that inevitably cuts through the clash between scarcity and excess, privilege and exclusion, and indirectly raises some crucial questions regarding the use and abuse of resources in a country that is currently facing a serious threat of desertification. His performance, the core of this work, is documented through several elements that comprise a nine-minute video recounting some salient moments of his ten-days long trip, and the rubber slippers he used during the journey.
        The work is inspired by the cult movie The Swimmer (1968), attributed to Eleanor and Frank Perry (although they were both fired and replaced by Sydney Pollack, who made substantial modifications before its release). Based on the homonymous short story by John Cheever, it stars Burt Lancaster as Ned Merrill, a self-defined legendary figure that swims eight miles back home across a series of pools belonging to his former friends and vapid acquaintances. Ned is received in these sumptuous properties with mixed reactions ranging from cheerful enthusiasm to revulsion and, in a dramatic plot development during this strange journey or waking hallucination, pool after pool the movie reveals details of his recent (and amnesiac) past that progressively eclipse the carefree and hedonistic tone of the trip.
        As the exhibition strongly emphasises, the pool is an unequivocal symbol of status and privilege, of social barriers, but also of a questionable misuse of scarce resources (energy, water). Pool by pool, water, the blue gold, forms a sapphire river that flows for the privileged, while life outside (animals including humans, and plants) are left to deal with the consequences of a harshening drought and thirst. Water evaporates quickly in the hot summer days of Spain, and the pools must be refilled at a rhythm that intensifies with the pace of global warming, in a detrimental Sisyphean loop that is usually carried out by the poor and for the wealthy. The abuse of natural resources and its inextricable ties to issues of class and distribution of wealth have become so evident by now, that these two sets of problems (socio-economic and environmental) can no longer be taught separately.



Fermín Jiménez Landa, The Swimmer, 2013, video, 8:54 min, film still. Courtesy: Fermín Jiménez Landa


        As it becomes clear while viewing Jiménez Landa’s The Swimmer, the walls and gates that separate the private pools from the public space grow in size and thickness along with the increase of socio-economic inequalities, as does their monitoring and patrolling. In Spain, the uneven distribution of wealth and power emerges as a gap between the north and the south, between the wealthy (generally identified in the south of Spain with individuals coming from abroad and buying properties) and those who work for them. The video traces a speculative straight line of snapshots that capture the uneven structure of economic power, and subsequently reveal the divide that exists across the country. Later in 2015, the artist realized the same performance in Guadalajara (Mexico), where the socio-economic inequalities and the distribution of privilege, as well as segregation, are notably more extreme. And here, in fact, most swimming pools are installed behind untrespassable walls by private security guards armed to the teeth, in remove shielded urban agglomerations known as condominios cerrados [Eng.: “closed neighbourhoods”]. Walls and fences grow proportionally with the extremization of inequalities they shield, not only marking a division between private property and public space, but also tracing an unambiguous partition between a few privileged urban clusters and the rest of the city. So if the film is partly about different layers of denial and madness—the one that is clinically diagnosed but also the one that goes unnoticed, perhaps because it constantly surrounds us—the work certainly highlights the second, uncovering the pathologic dynamic of societies with their uneven economic distribution and reckless cases of exceeding wealth facing extreme poverty.
        One may be tempted to ask if there is anything that may sober us up from this “Capitalist Realism” and revert this process before its inevitable collapse, and even though few have positive solutions to offer, some at least show that operating within the cracks is still possible. An example Jiménez Landa openly refers to in his work is a maverick phenomenon of occupation which became popular among like-minded young people in the UK around 2008, with unused private pools as its main target. Subverting the use of tracking and surveillance technologies against the protection of private property, these groups searched for temporarily empty swimming pools to crash and use while the owners were away. These encounters were coordinated through online platforms and quickly became a phenomenon, surely hedonistic in its execution but also with some political implications to the side; through the illegal (and mostly inoffensive) act of invading an empty private property only to use its infrastructures for a while, the youth reclaimed space and the redistribution of privilege, even if only for a few hours.
        Beyond being spaces of privilege and historical exclusion, pools bear an environmental responsibility in their misuse of resources like water and energy, not to mention the requirements of their making and maintenance: Fiberglass pools, those the artist is mostly interested in, primarily consist of non-biodegradable plastic and employ great amounts of chlorine and other chemicals to be kept clean, especially from algae. Another way of looking at this: Vegetal life-forms attempt to escape the drought and scarcity of a desertifying land by tentatively blooming in cracks and expanding their roots to the pools—rapidly annihilated by toxic substances that are proven harmful to the whole environment, including humans. When looked at with an alien eye, unaware of the mad normalization of our dominant cultural and socio-economic dynamics, the pool can be seen as a heavily anthropocentric device that seizes resources crucial to both human and non-human life by actively working in favour of accumulation and exclusion—and consequently, since there is no such thing as an “even growth”, openly against redistribution. Spain’s current threat of desertification extends to at least 75 percent of the land, and paradoxically (although unsurprisingly) this data coincides with the quickly growing market of prefabricated swimming pools: An industry that peaked this year as a consequence of the isolating constraints imposed with Covid-19. This excruciating tendency of the market to grow in parallel with the threat of desertification, but also with the rate of unemployment and poverty in Spain, foresees a future where the inequalities will be harsher and perhaps also marked by the possibility (or impossibility) to have access to clean water.
        By seeking for an alternative form of travel, swimming along an imagined river of pools, The Swimmer also embraces the act of “wasting time” in search for the unexpected and, in doing so, the artist actively counteracts the velocity imposed by our time, as well as the logic of our dominant economic system. Conversely, having the freedom to choose to waste time is per se an indicator of privilege, which is both acknowledged and questioned by Jiménez Landa. But the choice of taking a detour from the shortest, the quickest, the easiest path (the one recommended by Google Maps, also a product of the accelerationist logic mentioned above), puts the emphasis on the inherent eroticism of travel, the one that emerges when choosing the unexpected rather than submitting to the unsexy predictability of an almost entirely tracked and uploaded planet—“One travels with a hard-on”, wrote John Cheever in his journals. The sudden explosion of energy that can fuel an unexpected trip, or a surreal detour that leaves all the observers a bit curious and perplexed, is also a clever manoeuvre to fuel new connections, reflections, encounters, and maybe re-establish contact with a different self, as well as reinforce a sense of trust in the community that surrounds us—some traits that we have rapidly lost to rampant individualism, but that we are still in time to restore by finding alternatives to the future that awaits us.

FERMÍN JIMENÉZ LANDA (*1979 in Pamplona, Spanien) lebt und arbeitet in Valencia. Mit Performances, öffentlichen Interventionen und Installationen arbeitet er mit Prozessen der Äquivalenz, Inversion und Austauschbarkeit, die uns Realität aus einem anderen Blickwinkel zeigen, der absurd, ikonoklastisch, empirisch und nicht prüfbar sein kann. Inspiriert vom Alltäglichen und Vertrauten kreiert er subtile Aktionen und verzerrt die gewohnte Starrheit im öffentlichen Raum. Seine Arbeiten werden auf internationalen Festivals und Ausstellungen gezeigt zuletzt im Weissen Haus (Wien) im Programm Screening Apparatus (2020) und unter anderen bei der Manifesta 11 (Zürich), TIER (Berlin), im Künstlerhaus Bethanien, La Casa Encendida (Madrid) und MUSAC (León, Spanien).



Pool für Pool formen sie einen Fluss

vom Vanina Saracino


In seiner Performance El Nadador [dt.: „Der Schwimmer“] schwimmt Fermín Jiménez Landa über eine gerade Linie aus Schwimmbädern, die er mithilfe von GPS und Google Earth ausfindig gemacht hat, nach Hause. Indem er Spanien von Tarifa bis zum Swimmingpool seiner Eltern in Pamplona durchquert, untersucht er die Bedeutung von Ungewissheit im Gegensatz zu Vorhersehbarkeiten und konfrontiert den Nutzen von „Zeitverschwendung“ mit dem Ertrag von geplanter Produktivität. Auf seiner scheinbar surrealen Reise zeichnet er eine persönliche Landkarte des Territoriums nach, in dem zwangsläufig Konflikte zwischen Knappheit und Übermaß, Privilegien und Ausgrenzung überlappen und dabei indirekt dringende Fragen hinsichtlich des Nutzens von Ressourcen in einem Land aufwirft, das heute ernsthaft von Wüstenbildung bedroht ist. Die Performance, der Kern dieser Arbeit, wird hier anhand von mehreren Elementen dokumentiert, darunter ein neunminütiges Video mit herausragenden Momenten seiner zehn Tage langen Reise, sowie die Badeschuhe, die er dabei trug.
       
        Die Arbeit ist inspiriert von dem Kultfilm Der Schwimmer (1968), der Eleanor und Frank Perry zugeschrieben wird (obwohl beide gefeuert und durch Sydney Pollack ersetzt wurden, der vor der Veröffentlichung des Films substanzielle Änderungen vornahm). Basierend auf der gleichnamigen Kurzgeschichte von John Cheever, folgt der Film Ned Merrill (gespielt von Burt Lancaster), einer sich selbst als legendär definierenden Figur, dabei, wie sie durch eine Abfolge von Pools von ehemaligen Freunden und stumpfsinnigen Bekannten acht Meilen weit zurück nach Hause schwimmt. Ned wird in den luxuriösen Anwesen mit gemischten Reaktionen empfangen, die von fröhlicher Begeisterung bis zu Abscheu reichen. Als Teil des dramatischen Spannungsbogens dieser seltsamen Reise oder wachen Halluzination enthüllt der Film mit jedem neuen Pool Details der jüngeren (amnesischen) Vergangenheit des Hauptprotagonisten, die den sorglosen und hedonistischen Ton der Geschichte nach und nach verdrängen. 
        Wie die Ausstellung nachdrücklich betont, ist der Pool ein unmissverständliches Symbol für Status und Privilegien, für soziale Barrieren, aber auch für den fragwürdigen Missbrauch knapper Ressourcen (Energie, Wasser). Pool für Pool bildet das Wasser, das blaue Gold, einen saphirfarbenen Fluss, der durch die Anwesen der Privilegierten fließt, während das Leben draußen (Tiere, aber auch Menschen und Pflanzen) den Folgen einer fortschreitenden Dürre ausgesetzt ist und zunehmend verdurstet. In den heißen Sommertagen Spaniens verdunstet das Wasser schnell, und die Pools müssen in einem Rhythmus wieder aufgefüllt werden, der mit dem Tempo der globalen Erwärmung Schritt hält. Dies geschieht in einer Art Sisyphusarbeit, die zumeist von Armen für Reiche ausgeführt wird. Die Ausbeutung natürlicher Ressourcen und ihre unauflösbaren Verstrickungen mit Fragen der Klassenzugehörigkeit und Wohlstandsverteilung sind mittlerweile so offensichtlich, dass man diese beiden Problemfelder (das sozioökonomische und das ökologische) nicht länger voneinander getrennt behandeln kann. Beim Betrachten von Jiménez Landas The Swimmerwird ersichtlich, dass die Mauern und Tore, die die privaten Pools vom öffentlichen Raum trennen, mit zunehmender ökonomischer Ungleichheit größer werden, wie auch die Phänomene der Überwachung und der Nachbarschaftswachen. In Spanien entspricht die ungleiche Verteilung von Wohlstand und Macht der Kluft zwischen Norden und Süden, zwischen Reichen (die man in Südspanien im Allgemeinen mit Ausländern gleichsetzt, die dort Immobilien kaufen) und denen, die für sie arbeiten. Indem das Video einer spekulativen geraden Linie von Momentaufnahmen folgt, die das strukturelle Ungleichgewicht der Wirtschaftskraft erfassen, zeigt es die durch das ganze Land hindurch führende Trennlinie auf.
        Zwei Jahre später führte der Künstler die gleiche Performance in Guadalajara (Mexiko) aus, wo die sozioökonomischen Ungleichheiten und die Verteilung der Privilegien wie auch die soziale Segregation noch deutlich extremer sind. Tatsächlich sind hier die meisten Schwimmbäder hinter unüberwindlichen Mauern installiert, die von schwerbewaffneten privaten Sicherheitskräften geschützt werden. Sie befinden sich allesamt in abgeriegelten städtischen Ballungsräumen, die als condominios cerrados[dt.: „geschlossene Nachbarschaften“] bezeichnet werden. Die Höhe der Mauern und Zäune ist proportional zu den extremen Ungleichheitsverhältnissen, die sie zu bewahren helfen. Sie markieren nicht nur die Grenze zwischen Privateigentum und öffentlichem Raum, sondern auch eine klare Trennung zwischen einigen wenigen privilegierten städtischen Clustern und dem Rest der Stadt. Wenn es im Film also teilweise um verschiedene Ebenen von Verleugnung und Wahnsinn geht – der klinisch diagnostizierte, aber auch der, der unbemerkt bleibt, vielleicht weil er uns ständig umgibt –, so hebt die Arbeit vor allem Letzteren hervor und deckt die pathologische Dynamik von Gesellschaften und ihre durch rücksichtslosen Wohlstand einerseits und extreme Armut andererseits bezeugten ökonomischen Disparitäten auf. 
        Man könnte versucht sein zu fragen, ob es irgendetwas gibt, das uns von diesem „kapitalistischen Realismus“ (Mark Fisher, 2008) befreien und den Prozess vor seinem unvermeidlichen Zusammenbruch rückgängig machen könnte. Und obwohl kaum jemand eine positive Antwort parat hat, gibt es doch Zeugnisse dafür, dass man weiterhin in den Zwischenräumen operieren kann. Ein Beispiel, auf das Jiménez Landa in seiner Arbeit offen Bezug nimmt, ist eine unkonventionelle Methode der Hausbesetzung, die um 2008 bei gleichgesinnten jungen Menschen in Großbritannien populär wurde und deren Zielobjekte ungenutzte private Schwimmbecken waren. Diese Gruppen wendeten Trackingund Überwachungstechnologien subversiv gegen den Schutz des Privateigentums ein und suchten nach vorübergehend leeren Schwimmbädern, die sie während der Abwesenheit der Eigentümer nutzten. Die über Online-Plattformen koordinierten Aktionen wurden schnell zu einem Phänomen, das zweifellos hedonistisch in seiner Ausführung war, daneben aber auch politische Implikationen hatte. Durch das illegale (und meist harmlose) Eindringen in ein leeres Privateigentum, mit der Absicht, dessen Infrastruktur temporär zu nutzen, gelang es diesen Jugendlichen, Räume zurückzuerobern und Privilegien umzuverteilen, wenn auch nur für einige Stunden.


Fermín Jiménez Landa, The Swimmer, 2013, video, 8:54 min, film still. Courtesy: Fermín Jiménez Landa
 

Pools sind nicht nur Räume für Privilegien und historische Ausgrenzung, sondern tragen auch eine Mitschuld an der Umweltzerstörung durch ihren unverhältnismäßigen Verbrauch von Ressourcen wie Wasser und Energie, ganz zu schweigen von ihren Herstellungsund Wartungsanforderungen: Glasfaserpools (also jene Pools, an denen Landa am meisten interessiert ist) bestehen hauptsächlich aus nicht biologisch abbaubarem Kunststoff und benötigen große Mengen an Chlor und anderen Chemikalien, um frei von Unreinheiten, insbesondere Algen, zu bleiben. Man kann es auch andersherum sehen: Pflanzliche Lebensformen versuchen, der Dürre und Nahrungsknappheit eines austrocknenden Landes zu entkommen, indem sie zwischen den Spalten dieser Anwesen blühen und ihre Wurzeln zu den Becken hin ausdehnen, wo sie umgehend mithilfe von giftigen Substanzen vernichtet werden, die sich umgekehrt als schädlich für die ganze Umwelt erweisen, einschließlich des Menschen. Betrachtet man den Pool mit den Augen eines Außenstehenden, der sich der verrückten Normalisierung der vorherrschenden kulturellen und sozioökonomischen Dynamik nicht bewusst ist, kann man ihn als ein stark anthropozentrisches System verstehen, das Ressourcen vereinnahmt, die sowohl für das menschliche als auch nichtmenschliche Leben von entscheidender Bedeutung sind, indem es aktiv zugunsten der Akkumulation und Ausgrenzung und somit – da es kein „gleichmäßiges Wachstum“ gibt – offen gegen jegliche Umverteilung operiert. Die aktuelle Gefahr der Wüstenbildung in Spanien erstreckt sich auf mindestens 75 Prozent des Landes; paradoxerweise (wenn auch nicht wirklich überraschend) steht dieser Zahl ein schnell wachsender Markt für vorgefertigte Schwimmbäder gegenüber, eine Branche, die in diesem Jahr aufgrund der Maßnahmen zur sozialen Distanzierung infolge der Covid-19-Pandemie Rekordumsätze erzielte. Diese fürchterliche Tendenz eines parallel zur Wüstenbildung, aber auch zur Arbeitslosenund Armutsrate in Spanien wachsenden Markts lässt eine Zukunft voraussehen, in der die Ungleichheiten noch größer und vermutlich auch durch die Möglichkeit eines Zugangs zu sauberem bedingt sein werden.
        Auf der Suche nach einer alternativen Form des Reisens nimmt The Swimmer auch den Akt des „Zeitverschwendens“ auf der Suche nach dem Unerwarteten für sich in Anspruch. Dadurch widersetzt sich der Künstler sowohl der Ruhelosigkeit der heutigen Gesellschaft als auch der Logik des dominanten Wirtschaftssystems. Andererseits ist die Freiheit, seine Zeit zu verschwenden, ein Indikator für privilegiertes Leben, der hier gleichermaßen registriert und infrage gestellt wird. Doch indem er sich entscheidet, vom kürzesten, schnellsten und einfachsten Weg abzuweichen (der von Google Maps, ebenfalls ein Produkt der oben erwähnten Beschleunigungslogik, errechnet wurde), legt der Künstler den Schwerpunkt auf die inhärente Erotik des Reisens, die sich aus der Entscheidung für das Unerwartete ergibt, statt sich der gänzlich unerotischen Vorhersehbarkeit eines fast vollständig digital kartografierten und online gestellten Planeten zu unterwerfen: „Man reist mit einem Ständer in der Hose“, schreibt John Cheever in einem seiner Tagebücher. Die plötzliche Energie, die durch eine unerwartete Reise oder einen surrealen Umweg, der alle Beobachter ein wenig neugierig und ratlos macht, freigesetzt werden kann, ist auch ein kluges Manöver, um neue Verbindungen, Reflexionen, Begegnungen und möglicherweise den Kontakt mit einem anderen Ich wiederherzustellen, wie auch das Vertrauen in die uns umgebende Gemeinschaft zu stärken – Eigenschaften, derer wir durch den grassierenden Individualismus schnell verlustig geworden sind, die wir aber noch rechtzeitig wiederherstellen können, um eine Alternative zur erwartbaren Zukunft zu finden.




CURATOR
Valeria Schulte-Fischedick
ASSISTANCE
Gustav Elgin / Carola Uehlken
OPENING HOURS
6th of August – 15th of September
Tue—Sunday 
2—7 pm
Kottbusser Str. 10, 10999 Berlin

OPENING HOURS
Tue—Sunday
2—7 pm
Kottbusser Str. 10,  10999 Berlin

CURATOR
Valeria Schulte-Fischedick

ASSISTANCE
Gustav Elgin / Carola Uehlken

Impressum
Kontakt
︎︎︎︎